Anacortes Club

Club hours: 2018-2019 School Year, Monday-Friday: 2 – 6 p.m.

Teen Hours: Teen only hours (without younger members present) are Monday-Fridays: 2 – 3:30 p.m. Teens are welcome to stay until 6pm. Teen Nights: Select Fridays, 6 – 10 p.m. Teen members are those attending middle school or high school. 

2018 Summer Hours: Morning Program: 7am to 2pm. Drop-In: 2pm to 6pm.

Who Can Attend the Club? Any youth ages 6 (or completed Kindergarten) to 18. Buses are available from select schools.

Membership Information: Please see the Club Membership page for more information and forms.

2018–2019 School Year Enrollment: Enrollment is currently open for new members. All families wishing to enroll must do so, in person, at their corresponding Club. All memberships expire on Aug 31, 2018, and must be renewed for the new school year. Memberships are valid from September 1, 2018 to August 31st, 2019. Space is limited. We encourage families to re-enroll immediately when Open Enrollment begins. Membership registrations and renewals will be accepted Monday – Friday from 2:00pm – 5:00pm. All relevant forms are available from the Forms page. Please allow approximately 30 minutes to register.

Family Nights: Family nights are held quarterly. Open to members and their families, this is a great time to enjoy dinner together, bestow recognition for Club members’ achievements, and play some fun games.

Club Director: Kristin Parkins

Location: City Hall Basement,  904 6th Street, Anacortes, WA 98221

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 947, Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Contact: (360) 419-3723 x11

A Field Trip to the Seattle Art Museum

Youth observe “Mann und Maus” on display at the Seattle Art Museum.

Club members were able to visit the Seattle Art Museum this summer. Stefano Perruccio, the Clubs’ Art Specialist was one of the chaperones for the trip. Stefano spends time at each of the Clubs coming up with thoughtful art projects for the youth to participate in and he was especially excited about this opportunity. “The museum trip offered an exposure to a variety of art within many cultures all over the world, from modern, to traditional, to indigenous all in one space. I enjoyed witnessing their engagement and energy,” he said. 

Tammy Findlay, Director of Marketing, was also able to make the trip and snap some photos. Of her experience on the trip, she said, “One of the first exhibits we viewed was a very large sculpture of an oversized black mouse sitting on top of a man lying in bed all in white. I asked one of the members if they had any thoughts on what it meant. They were confused by the question, but then had a very literal interpretation. ‘A big rat sat on him and he’s probably dead.’ I said I didn’t know what the sculpture meant, but that maybe the mouse represented something like anxiety. They said, ‘that’s weird!’ I continued asking members about details of various exhibits throughout, and soon members were coming up to me and sharing their interpretation of the art. I really enjoyed their thought process, and how they became more engaged when they realized that they were allowed to have an opinion about what they were viewing.” 

In addition to admiring the works of art, kids were challenged to remain quiet, not touch the work and adhere to boundaries set by the museum. A difficult feat, to say the least, but they all did a masterful job overall. Stefano remarked that he wished museums were more accessible to a younger audience, more interactive, and not so “buttoned-up”.  This might have been one of the reasons that they loved the Three Empathics virtual display, part of the African art collection. The dark room featured neon-projecting, changing images on the wall and on the floor while playing calming music. Some of the youth mimicked the poses of the 3 seemingly meditating or yogic figures and let the images display on them as they lay on the floor. 

Stefano followed up the experience with an art project. He explained, “After the trip, members created their own masks with paper mâché, exploring all the different styles of masks that we saw at the museum, Pacific Islander, Latin American, African American, and Native American. This brought the experience full-circle and provided hands-on learning that was more relatable for them, instead of the strictly academic viewpoint of the museum. This gave them the opportunity to be directly engaged, creating, instead of only viewing.”

Exposure to different types of artwork has shown to have an impact on kids learning and overall academic health. Visiting the museum, and providing Club kids with an “adult” perspective on art is just one more tool that helps the Clubs achieve one of their priority outcomes of Academic Success.

The Anacortes Club and The First Tee Link Up

Youth Gain an Introduction to Golf Basics

Last week the Anacortes Boys & Girls Club and The First Tee linked up to provide a unique experience for Club members. The snow was falling, but that did not stop local golf pro Tom Perry and First Tee Coordinator Kjell Carlsen from teaching 15 eager Club members basic golf skills in the Anacortes Club’s gym.

The First Tee is an internationally recognized youth program that introduces the game of golf and its inherent values to young people. The learning program focuses on nine core values – honesty, integrity, sportsmanship, respect, confidence, responsibility, perseverance, courtesy and judgment. Anacortes’ local First Tee chapter is sponsored by Anacortes Sunrisers Kiwanis Club in partnership with Swinomish Golf Links, two organizations that also support the Boys & Girls Clubs. The program hopes to provide opportunities for fun, self-confidence, and sportsmanship skills for the kids who participate in their program. They offer Golf Clinics for ages 7-18, as well as a tournament in August. 

For most Club members, this was their first introduction to the game. Using oversized golf clubs, tennis balls, and velcro targets, members were able to safely achieve success. They worked on putting and chipping and tried to stay focused on “keeping their Y” in their golf swing with mentorship provided by Tom & Kjell.  

The First Tee Link Program and Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County share values that align for a great partnership, including the idea that any kid who wants to be part of the program will have an opportunity to do so. Moving forward, The First Tee hopes to work with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County to reach a diverse group of kids who have an interest in the sport of golf.

Those interested in learning more about The First Tee Link Program can visit www.anacortestft.com

Pop-up Library brings books to the Anacortes Club

Throughout the year, Club Members at the Anacortes Boys and Girls Club had the opportunity to spend an hour reading every day, thanks to a local partnership with the Anacortes Public Library, who were able to provide some special reading opportunities for youth through their Pop-up Library Program. The program began last summer, and was so popular that they decided to continue into the school year.

Children’s Librarian Leslie Wilson, visits the Anacortes Boys & Girls Club on a regular basis to host the Pop-Up Library. The system uses a new web-based library catalog that makes it possible to take library services out into the community.

Wilson said that they started doing Pop-up Libraries in May at a STEM event at the Middle School. And that it is surprisingly easy. “All we need is internet access. The Pop-up Library enables us to check out books, place holds, provide member info, issue new library cards, and more,” she said. Wilson explained that thru their weekly visits to the Club during the summer, they were able to streamline the process.  “The program has really improved. It helped us figure out what worked and what didn’t, really fine tune the program.”

The Pop-up library was also very popular with the kids. “What I liked about the pop-up library was that we got to check out books without going to the real library. I also liked hearing the different stories Leslie read to us,” said Club Member Alaea Cerrillo. The Boys and Girls Club has a library of books that the kids can choose from, but the Pop-up Library expanded their choices.

“I could tell how excited the kids were, because of how patiently they waited to check out their books. We run choice-based programs at the Club, so there are activities going on simultaneously. Lots of kids were choosing to look at the library books that were brought in and check out new ones for next time.” said the Club’s Marketing Director, Tammy Findlay.

Wilson explained, “The Club members really enjoyed being able to request books. It was great seeing how excited kids were getting them. It also helped us really tailor the program to meet the kid’s interest.” Some of the most popular requests included Guinness Book of World Records, Pete the Cat, and graphic novels.