Burlington Club Youth Tour Police Department

Officer Josh Murdock of the Burlington Police Department visited the kids at the Burlington Boys & Girls Club for some on-the-spot fun this summer, dropping in for game of dodgeball, and recently, he took members on a VIP tour of the police station.

It’s a bit of a walk to the Burlington Police station from the Club at Maiben Park, but officer Murdock was there to help chaperone, making sure drivers slowed down, and kids could cross the streets safely. Upon arrival, officer Murdock spent some time showing the kids all of the tools on his belt, and talking about how they are used. One thing youth were surprised to learn that officer

s are exposed to pepper spray as part of their training. He also explained that the tools on his belt are there to keep him safe and other people safe, and that he has never fired his gun outside of training at the firing range. He showed how his two different sets of handcuffs work, and later, even showed how fast he can apply them. Staff Program Coordinator, Andrew Flores was soon rendered immobile, but was a good sport about the demonstration.

Officer D. Pehrson came out for a quick visit before heading out on his traffic beat. He gave a snapshot into a typical day on the force. He said that morning he had responded to a house alarm that turned out to be a false alarm, and that he found a dog and returned it to its owner.

Inside, youth met Officer Mike Lumpkin, who admitted that he was aware that his last name was a lot like Pumpkin. This got the kids laughing. He gave the out a gift of cool mood pencils to the kids. Then they visited the holding cell area, and the control room, where they saw all of the traffic cameras, and officer Murdock showed them how he could control them remotely to show a different view. Outside, officer Murdock opened up a Chevy Tahoe police cruiser and turned on the siren. At the end of the tour, he shook each member’s hand and asked what they had learned from the tour. One thing that was impressed upon the children, was that just because
someone makes a mistake, it doesn’t make them a bad person.

“It’s important for our kids to have a positive relationship with Law Enforcement. Police are here to protect and help us. Interactions like these help build trust among the kids, that they can rely on first responders should the need arise,” said Manny Smith, Director of Operations for the Clubs. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County would like to thank the Burlington Police Department for taking the time to interact with and educate Club youth.